The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.”

~ Thucydides quotes Ancient Greek historian and author, 460-404bc

Across the country, many people are enjoying a 3-day weekend in honour of Memorial Day. Perhaps as we attend family gatherings and barbecues, and flock to beaches to celebrate the unofficial beginning of summer, we can take a moment to remember the original meaning of Memorial Day.

This day of remembrance was originally called ‘Decoration Day,’ and it was meant to take time to reflect upon those who died in service of this nation, first in the Civil War and now those who have lost their lives in our most recent and ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The U.S. still has many of our men and women of the armed forces stationed around the world — keeping watch and serving others. While we can and should sit and debate the size of the overblown military budget; the hazards of kowtowing to the Military Industrial Complex that President Eisenhower warned us about; and why peace should be synonymous with survival and prosperity, it will never change the fact that our gratitude belongs to our uniformed men and women, and all of their families, as they do the jobs they were called to do — no matter how great the cost is to themselves and their loved ones.

“For love of country they accepted death.”

~ James A. Garfield

 

Let’s not forget those who have passed, but let’s also not forget those who have returned to us traumatised and in need of our support. And, no less important, let us not forget those who are, without media attention, missing in action and prisoners of wars that were not of their own making.

Sacrificing one’s life for freedom? It’s what America is about…and we all need to do our part to make sure that those sacrifices are not in vain.

“I have never been able to think of the day as one of mourning; I have never quite been able to feel that half-masted flags were appropriate on Decoration Day. I have rather felt that the flag should be at the peak, because those whose dying we commemorate rejoiced in seeing it where their valor placed it. We honor them in a joyous, thankful, triumphant commemoration of what they did.”
~ Benjamin Harrison

Peace to us all.

____________________________
The Brooklyn Dame is that snarky Brooklyn chick from the UK who founded Borderless News and Views. She enjoys left-side politics, economics, finance and great seafood chased with a glass of Muscato. When she’s not plotting her escape from her corporate overlords, she’s writing ‘fight the wrongs on the Right’ articles. You can follow her on Twitter and read more of her posts on the BNV site or on BNV’s Facebook page.

By Brooklyn Dame

The Brooklyn Dame is a dame from the UK. She’s an ever-evolving student of the world and globe-hopper who currently calls Brooklyn, USA home. She’s an overly-degreed, prospective escapee from indentured servitude in corporate America who has an opinion about (nearly) everything. Of course, there are some things about which she’d have to try really hard to muster up an ounce of care; she’s worn out after she reads up on politics, finance and global events. You can follow her, and her site, Borderless News and Views, on Facebook and Twitter.

4 thoughts on “Memorial Day 2012”
  1. […] What does all of this mean today? For many, not much. The three-day weekend that accompanies the day is usually utilized as a mini-vacation and not a weekend along with a day of remembrance.  And why should it? We are so disconnected from the wars being fought and the troops coming home that Memorial Day is about BBQ’s and the Indie 500 for many Americans. We support the wars but not the soldiers. […]

  2. I agree that we should never forget about the sacrifices people have made, for whatever reason they chose to do so. And it doesn’t matter whether you’re pro-war or a pacifist it shouldn’t, in any way, affect the respect they rightfully deserve.

  3. […] What does all of this mean today? For many, not much. The three-day weekend that accompanies the day is usually utilized as a mini-vacation and not a weekend along with a day of remembrance.  And why should it? We are so disconnected from the wars being fought and the troops coming home that Memorial Day is about BBQ’s and the Indie 500 for many Americans. We support the wars but not the soldiers. […]

  4. […] in past and current wars. We pay special tribute honoring the memory of those who have made the ultimate sacrifice of their lives. Memorial Day, for most of us, comes once a year. However, for many of our […]

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